Hours & Directions

Hours
Trinity Church
7am - 6pm Weekdays
8am - 4pm Saturday
7am - 4pm Sunday
212-602-0800
Trinity Churchyard
7am - 4pm Weekdays
8am - 3pm Saturday and Holidays
7am - 3pm Sunday
Broadway and Wall Street
Location
Broad Street
Rector Street
Wall Street
Hours
St. Paul's Chapel
10am - 6pm Monday - Saturday
7am - 6pm Sunday
Closed on November 27 for Thanksgiving
212.602.0800
St. Paul's Churchyard
10am - 4pm Monday - Saturday
7am - 3:30pm Sunday
Broadway and Fulton Street
Location
Brooklyn Bridge-City Hall
Chambers Street
Broadway-Nassau Street
Hours
Preschool
50 Park Place
212.602.0829
Park Place and West Broadway
Location
Chambers Street
Broadway-Nassau Street
Hours
Weekdays
12pm-5pm
Parishioners with key card may access the space from 8am-10pm.
Sundays
8am-3pm
Trinity Place and Rector Street
Location
Broad Street
Rector Street
Wall Street
Hours
Trinity Cemetery and Mausoleum
9am - 4pm Daily
Office open Monday-Friday only
155th and Riverside Drive
Location

Congregational Office

CLERGY  |  CHAPELS  |  ANNIVERSARIES/EVENTS  |  SERVICE MATERIAL  |  SERMONS  |  OFFICIAL ACTS  |  MINISTRY 

Congregational Office, 1716-1987

Clergy 1852-1987, 10 boxes, 5 linear feet

Historical Note:

The 1697 charter of Trinity Church made provision for an assistant to the Rector. In December, 1894, the Vestry resolved to replace the title of Assistant Minister with Vicar or Curate. The Vicar was the primary priest for each church or chapel. The Curate’s position was below Vicar.

Scope and Content Note:

Although each chapel in Trinity Parish had its own Vicar and clergy, Archives holds records only from a few of the clergy of Trinity Church and St. Paul’s Chapel.

 

Trinity Church Clergy

Ogilby, Frederick, Assistant Minister (1855-1878)

1 file

Historical Note:

According to the 1879 yearbook obituary, Dr. Ogilby “organized the Sunday School, in 1855, and in 1859 he formed an Industrial School.” He also oversaw the charitable work among the poor and was in charge of the Daily Parish School.

Scope and Content Note:

The Rev. Ogilby’s records are letters dating from 1852 to 1857.

Newman, Bernard C. (1948-1968)

2 boxes, .5 linear feet

Historical Note:

Father Newman was appointed Vicar in 1948. During his tenure, the congregation grew and more clergy staff was added. Newman created outreach ministries to Wall Street and the financial community. His brother, Charles Newman, served as Vicar of St. Paul’s Chapel from 1947 to 1949.

Scope and Content Note:

Father Newman’s files include information on Wall Street activities and special services. The dates covered are 1944 to 1970.

Woodward, Donald R. (1968-1973) 

1966-1973, 1 box, .5 linear feet

Historical Note:

The Reverend Woodward came to Trinity from Kansas City, Missouri where he was dean of the Cathedral. He left in 1973 to become Rector of the Church of Holy Communion.

Scope and Content Note:

Woodward’s records contain files on services, vestments, and church silver.

Trinity/St. Paul's Chapel 
Trinity Church and St. Paul's Chapel merged congregations in 1975. 

Herlong, Bertram (1977-1979) 

1968-1979, 1 box, .5 linear feet

Historical Note:

Bertram Herlong was appointed Associate Rector in 1972. He was made vicar of Trinity/St. Paul's in 1977. He resigned the position to become Dean of St. Paul's Cathedral in Detroit in 1979.

Scope and Content Note:

Most of Vicar Herlong's records date from his time as Associate Rector--files on stewardship, the Wall Street Ministry, Real Estate, Chapel independence, and Parish Management. 

May, Richard L (1979-1987) 

1977-1987, 2 boxes, 1 linear foot

Historical Note:

The Reverend May was appointed Vicar of Trinity/St. Paul’s in 1979. He had been the Executive Assistant to the Rector since 1977. He resigned in 1987 to become the Rector of Bruton Parish in Virginia.

Scope and Content Note:

The Reverend May’s files include information on the West Cornwall Conference Center, the Cemetery Mausoleum, St. Cornelius and the Rector’s succession.

 

Vicars, St. Paul’s Chapel

Geer, William Montague (1894-1918) 

1910, 1 file

Historical Note:

The Reverend Geer introduced programs to reach out to the business community. He inaugurated the first noonday and midnight services for surrounding workers. He organized the Business Women’s Club to minister to women, who were only then entering the work force in large numbers. Geer resigned in 1918.

Scope and Content Note:

The Reverend Geer’s file contains mostly information about services at St. Paul’s. 

McComas, Joseph (1918-1938) 

1914-1938, 1 box, .5 linear feet

Historic Note:

Dr. McComas was known, according to his obituary, for his liberal sermons addressing contemporary social controversies. He introduced the annual British Harvest Festival in 1921. He supervised the renovation of the chapel, returning it from its late 19th neo-Gothic incarnation to an approximation of its original appearance. Dr. McComas resigned in 1936.

Scope and Content Note:

Dr. McComas’ files cover services, his sermons, the George Washington pew, and the Washington prayer.


Newman, Charles W. (1947-1949)

1947-1948, 3 files

Historic Note:

No vicar was appointed at St. Paul’s after the retirement of Joseph McComas in 1938. In 1940, Robert J Gibson was appointed curate with duties at St. Paul’s. He was named vicar in 1943 and served until he was forced to retire due to illness in 1947. Charles W. Newman was then named vicar of St. Paul’s. He joined Trinity as a priest in 1946, primarily to serve as Secretary of the Parish Anniversary Celebrations commemorating the parish’s 250 years. Newman’s brother, Bernard C. Newman, served as Vicar of Trinity Church from 1948 to 1968.

Scope and Content Note:

See the Anniversaries/ Events/ Celebrations series for Father Newman’s files on the parish’s 250th Anniversary. His records as vicar contain a 1948 scrapbook of clippings, articles and orders of service for Saint Paul’s as well as a flower budget.

Hunsicker, Robert (1950-1975) 

1878-1979, 23 boxes, 12.5 linear feet

Historic Note:

The Rev. Hunsicker was named Acting Vicar in 1949 and Vicar of St. Paul’s Chapel in 1950. In 1975, the congregations of Trinity and St. Paul’s merged and the St. Paul’s office was closed. The positions of Vicar, Curate, and organist were terminated. At that time, Hunsicker was named parish historiographer.

During Hunsicker’s 25 years as Vicar of St. Paul’s, the chapel developed a program of five daily services, and a pastoral ministry at hospitals and nursing homes. St. Paul’s experienced a revival of the liturgical practices of Good Friday, Palm Sunday and Easter Eve. It was host to numerous religious and political dignitaries, such as Eleanor Roosevelt. Under Hunsicker, the chapel was given a thorough renovation and a new organ was added.

Scope and Content Note:

Hunsicker’s copious files concern St. Paul’s events, services, anniversaries, historical subjects, and chapel renovation. There is also a small amount of administrative and financial material. Hunsicker’s records contain several boxes of photographs, the bulk of which are of the chapel interior. His files, especially subject files, contain numerous clippings. See also “Historiographer”

Curate

The position of Vicar at Trinity Parish began in the 19th century as Assistant Minister. In December, 1894, the Vestry resolved to replace the title of Assistant Minister with Vicar or Curate. The Vicar would be the primary priest for each church or chapel. The Curate’s position was below Vicar. Robert Herrick is the only curate represented. 

Herrick, Robert, Trinity Church (1969-1974) 

1953-1974, 3 boxes, 1.5 linear feet

Historical Note:

Robert Herrick was called to Trinity as a curate. When he resigned, his position had been recently renamed Liturgical Officer.

Scope and Content Note:

Fr. Herrick’s files contain library accessions, Parish Programs, Services, Correspondence, and a file on the Institution of Dr. Parks as rector.

 

Liturgical Officers

Camp, Peter (1974-1980) 

1975-1977, 3 files

Historical Note:

The Rev. Camp was appointed Liturgical/Cultural Affairs Officer for Trinity Church on 1974. He left in 1980 to accept a call as rector in New Hampshire.

Scope and Content Note: 
Camp’s files are on special services relating to the American Bicentennial and on a program to train seminarians by placing them in an urban setting (ISTEM). 

Brown, Percival (1980-1989) 

Liturgical/Mission Officer for Trinity/St. Paul’s 
1987, 1 file 

 

Verger, 1945-1957

4 files

Historical Note:

Vergers are lay ministers who work with clergy on service planning and production, and assist in the marshalling of processions. At Trinity, Vergers are also responsible for hospitality ministry in the church.

Scope and Content Note:

The records contain photographs and poor box income dating from 1945 to 1957.

Chapels

1824-1983, 11 boxes, 5.5 linear feet

Historical Note:

At various times in its more than 300 year history, Trinity Parish has included a total of twelve different chapels. Some were created to serve scattered communicants who followed the general shift uptown in Manhattan. Others were founded to further missionary work in less well-to-do communities, or were independent parishes that were absorbed by Trinity. Six of the chapels were added under the rectorate of the Rev. Morgan Dix in the late 19th century. Most chapels still in existence in the 1970s were made independent in 1976. The exceptions were St. Paul’s Chapel and the Chapel of St. Cornelius the Centurion on Governor’s Island.

Scope and Content Note:

This small series contains mostly material regarding events, artifacts, and chapel histories. For records on chapel buildings see Finance—Property Management; for official acts, see Congregational Office—Official Acts. Chapel information can also be found in Vestry Minutes and Papers, Vestry Committee Minutes and Papers, and Rector’s papers.

 

All Chapels, n. d.

1 file plus artifacts

Scope and Content Note:

This series contains artifacts from parish chapels which include flags, vestments, and tools used to install chapel cornerstones.

 

St. Paul’s Chapel

1866-1970, 1 box, .5 linear feet

Historical Note:

St. Paul’s Chapel was built on Broadway and Fulton Street in 1766 as the parish’s second chapel-of-ease. Following the destruction of Trinity Church in the fire of 1776, the chapel became the parish’s primary location of worship. George Washington attended services at St. Paul’s after his inauguration in 1789 at New York’s Federal Hall.

By the mid-19th century, the chapel was suffering from a depletion in congregation, and it sought to broaden its services. The Rev. Morgan Dix worked closely with St. Paul’s from 1855 to 1872, developing its neighborhood ministry. The chapel had a Sunday school, a girls’ school, and a number of guilds. In the late 19th century, St. Paul’s Vicar the Rev. William Geer actively recruited the downtown business community to join the congregation.

In the early 20th century, communicants had further fallen off, and the girls’ school and kindergarten closed. The Sunday school and guilds were not well attended. However, weekday services, feasts, and festivals were still popular. St. Paul’s conducted outreach into the local community, forming a popular lunch club for working women, ministries for sailors and night workers, and a Chinese Sunday school.

In 1950, St. Paul’s named the Rev. Robert Hunsicker Vicar. His tenure lasted 25 years. The chapel developed a program of five daily services, and a pastoral ministry at hospitals and nursing homes. St. Paul’s experienced a revival of Anglo-Catholic liturgical practices for Good Friday, Palm Sunday and Easter Eve. It was host to numerous religious and political dignitaries, such as Eleanor Roosevelt.

In 1975, the congregations of Trinity Church and St. Paul’s Chapel merged and the St. Paul’s office was closed. The positions of Vicar, Curate, and organist were terminated. 
A homeless shelter was begun in the balcony of the chapel in 1983. Following the Sept. 11, 2001 attack, St. Paul’s, located directly across from the World Trade Center, served as a refuge for recovery workers at Ground Zero. 

Scope and Content Note:

For records on St. Paul’s building, see also Finance—Property Management; for sacramental registers, see Congregational Office—Official Acts. Chapel information can also be found in Vestry Minutes and Papers, Vestry Committee Minutes and Papers, and Rector’s papers. The Clergy series in Congregational Office has material on St. Paul’s vicars.

St. Paul’s material includes stained glass, scrapbooks, school paraphernalia, medals, souvenir plates, anniversary files, and 18 parish and church history books and pamphlets that had been located in the Vestry building cornerstone. The Vestry Building, stretching from Vesey to Fulton Street, stood from 1887 to 1928.

  

Chapel of St. Cornelius the Centurion

1868-1983, 3 Boxes, 1.5 linear feet

Historical Note:

The Chapel of St. Cornelius the Centurion was built on Governor’s Island in New York Harbor in 1846 through the efforts of the army chaplain, the Rev. John McVickar. Trinity Church provided McVickar and his successors with continuous support. By 1866, the War Department stopped providing chaplains to Governor’s Island. Trinity Church offered to maintain a chaplain at her own cost if the army would agree to place the chapel under the parish’s control. St. Cornelius became a part of Trinity Parish as a free chapel in 1868.

The Parish replaced the small wooden church with a new chapel designed by Charles C. Haight in 1906. In 1924, the agreement between the Army and Trinity was modified so that the Army paid the chaplain’s salary while Trinity maintained the building. St. Cornelius’ chaplains were honorary vicars and part of parish clergy. A 1954 agreement allowed chaplains from other Protestant denominations to use St. Cornelius to conduct services. This arrangement lasted until 1966, when the army turned over control of Governor’s Island to the U.S. Coast Guard. Under the Coast Guard, the Navy Chaplain Corps had the responsibility of assigning chaplains.

In the early 1970s, Trinity parish discontinued ordinary maintenance and janitorial services for St. Cornelius, but it continued to assist with major maintenance and provide insurance coverage

In 1980, the parish and St. Cornelius reached an agreement by which Trinity would lease the chapel to the U.S. Government for $1 per year. Then in 1986, Trinity donated the chapel to the U.S. Government, under the stipulation that it would revert to the parish if the government ceased to own the land underlying the chapel or to use the building as a military chapel. The Coast Guard vacated Governor’s Island in 1996, and Trinity regained ownership of the chapel, which is no longer in use.

Scope and Content Note:

For records on St. Cornelius' buildings, see also Finance—Property Management; for sacramental registers, see Congregational Office—Official Acts. Chapel information can also be found in Vestry Minutes and Papers, Vestry Committee Minutes and Papers, and Rector’s papers.

St. Cornelius the Centurion harbored a substantial collection of military flags from a variety of battles and regiments, from the Mexican, Civil, Spanish-American, World and other wars. Much of the material relating to the chapel concerns the military flags and the history of the island. Office files contain correspondence regarding chapel business. Artifacts include carvings, altar pieces, a communion plate, and wooden panels. The flags were given to the United States Army Center of Military History in 1981.

 

Chapel of the Intercession

1913-1966, 3 files

Historical Note:

The Church of the Intercession was founded in 1847 in Upper Manhattan. It was situated near Trinity’s uptown cemetery, founded in 1843. By the 20th Century, Intercession was in need of a new building to contain its increasing congregation and Trinity had long intended to erect a parish chapel in its uptown cemetery. The two negotiated their needs and, in 1907, Intercession became a chapel of Trinity Parish. A new building designed by Bertram G. Goodhue was erected, opening in 1914. By 1921, the chapel had nearly 3,300 communicants. The Chapel of the Intercession was made independent in 1976.

Scope and Content Note:

For records on the Chapel of the Intercession’s building, see also Finance—Property Management; for sacramental registers, see Congregational Office—Official Acts. Chapel information can also be found in Vestry Minutes and Papers, Vestry Committee Minutes and Papers, and Rector’s papers.

The archives contains correspondence on the altar stone dated 1913, a file on the 50th Anniversary, and a history by the Chapel’s vicar, the Rev. Milo Gates.

 

St. Agnes Chapel

1890-1942, 3 files

Historical Note:

In 1887, the committee charged with parish development recommended expanding Trinity to the west side of the city, north of 59th Street, due to the rapid development of the Upper West Side in the late 19th century. In 1892, St. Agnes Chapel opened on W. 92nd Street near Columbus Avenue. The Rev. William Manning—later rector of Trinity and bishop of New York—was Vicar of St. Agnes from 1903 to 1908.

St. Agnes prospered in the early 20th century. Its communicants list was twice as large as any other chapel, and by 1908 had exceeded that of Trinity Church. By 1916, St. Agnes had approximately 2,500 communicants. In addition, the chapel had a day school, a Sunday school, kindergarten, and numerous clubs and guilds.

The chapel continued to prosper until around 1930. The upper west side neighborhood experienced an influx of Catholics and Jews, and St. Agnes members moved to the Upper East Side and further. Numbers for communicants and official acts steadily declined throughout the decade, and the chapel was officially closed in 1943, having sold its property to the nearby Trinity School. The chapel was demolished in 1944.

Scope and Content Note:

For records on St. Agnes’ building, see also Finance—Property Management; for sacramental registers, see Congregational Office—Official Acts. Chapel information can also be found in Vestry Minutes and Papers, Vestry Committee Minutes and Papers, and Rector’s papers.

The archives contains papers on the Consecration of St. Agnes and Vestry Minutes. There is also a written record of the Chapel’s activities, and parish registers.

 

St. Augustine’s Chapel / All Saints

1824-1959, 7 files, .5 linear feet

Historical Note:

Trinity’s mission work on the Bowery in the mid-19th century led to the creation of a temporary mission for the area in 1868. In 1877, St. Augustine’s was consecrated at 105 E. Houston Street as a free mission chapel. Mission chapels had free pews, and their congregations could not vote in vestry elections. Early in its history, St. Augustine’s worked primarily with the German immigrants in the neighborhood. Later it administered to the Italian immigrants, as well as Russians and Eastern Europeans, who came to New York in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The chapel had schools for English and practical arts; in 1910, services in Italian were begun.

World War I caused a cutback in the work at St. Augustine’s, and the industrial classes at the mission house were shut down. In 1921, the major portion of the parish house was turned over to the Diocese’s Commission on Social Service, which conducted social welfare and “Americanization” programs. During the 1920s, the chapel’s primary function was social work. The chapel also shared its space with a Russian Orthodox congregation.

The changing nature of the neighborhood, coupled with the severe economic hardship of the depression, created a decline in the chapel’s communicants. In 1945, St. Augustine’s merged its congregation with that of All Saints Church at 292 Henry Street, using the Henry Street location for its permanent home. From 1945 to 1949, the chapel was known as St. Augustine’s-All Saints, becoming simply St. Augustine’s after that. The chapel catered to a neighborhood comprised of mostly low-income housing. St. Augustine’s was made independent in 1976.

Scope and Content Note:

For records on St. Augustine’s building, see also Finance—Property Management; for sacramental registers, see Congregational Office—Official Acts. Chapel information can also be found in Vestry Minutes and Papers, Vestry Committee Minutes and Papers, and Rector’s papers.

Files for St. Augustine’s are mostly the contents of the cornerstone. Also included are clippings regarding gang violence and murders on the Lower East Side and youth work at the chapel. Volumes contain information on membership and finances. Artifacts include the cornerstone items, pins, and a seal. Items for All Saints predate its merge with St. Augustine’s. They include minutes, accounts, and a service register.

 

St. Christopher’s Chapel

1949-1961, 2 files

Historical Note:

Trinity Parish had two chapels with the name of St. Christopher’s. The first was located in the Trinity Mission House at 211 Fulton Street. It opened in 1896 and closed with the Mission House in 1956.

Trinity purchased the former Jacob Riis Settlement on Henry Street in 1950, creating a second St. Christopher’s Chapel. The chapel administered to Lower East Side residents, and closed in 1971. The building became the Church of Our Savior, a Chinese mission.

Scope and Content Note:

For records on St. Christopher’s building, see also Finance—Property Management; for parish registers, see Congregational Office—Official Acts. Chapel information can also be found in Vestry Minutes and Papers, Vestry Committee Minutes and Papers, and Rector’s papers.

The archives holds a photo album and service records.

 

St. Chrysostom’s Chapel

1862-1914, 5 boxes

Historical Note:

In 1867, a New York State statute authorized the erection of free churches and chapels. That year, Trinity Chapel opened St. Chrysostom’s on the corner of 39th St. and Seventh Ave. as a mission chapel with free pews. The chapel building, designed by Richard Upjohn, opened in 1869. In the late 19th Century, St. Chrysostom’s area was composed primarily of Irish and West Indian immigrants, living in boarding homes and tenements. The neighborhood was becoming more commercial, as hotels, saloons, and theaters proliferated.

St. Chrysostom’s was led by the Rev. Thomas Henry Sill from its inception until 1910. Following his death, the chapel went into further decline as the commercial nature of the neighborhood increased. It was closed in 1924, and its members transferred to St. Clement’s Church. The building was demolished.

Scope and Content Note:

For records on St. Chrysostom’s building, see also Finance—Property Management; for parish registers, see Congregational Office—Official Acts. Chapel information can also be found in Vestry Minutes and Papers, Vestry Committee Minutes and Papers, and Rector’s papers.

The bulk of St. Chrysostom’s material relates to its Vicar, the Rev. Thomas Sill, and includes correspondence, sermons, notebooks, a visit book, and Sill family material. The contents of the cornerstone time capsule include mostly religious publications. The scrapbook contains ephemera regarding the chapel’s services and festivals.

 

St. George’s Chapel

1861-1872, 2 files

Historical Note:

By the middle of the eighteenth century, Trinity deemed it desirable to construct its first chapel-of-ease for its increasingly far-flung communicants. St. George’s Chapel opened on the corner of Beekman and Cliff Streets on the eastern side of the island in 1752. St. George’s was made independent in 1811, and was endowed with 33 Church Farm lots on condition that the Beekman Street property always be used as a Church. As the neighborhood changed to commercial interests, the vestry of St. George’s began the building of a new Church at Stuyvesant Square. Trinity Church agreed in 1850 to take back the Beekman Street Building in order to continue its use as a Church. The congregation of the Church of the Holy Evangelists worshiped at the site with financial assistance from Trinity from 1851 to 1860. The congregation was then re-organized as The Free Church of St. George’s Chapel. Trinity finally agreed to the Church’s sale in 1868. George Templeton Strong wrote in his diary on May 19 of that year, “They are beginning to pull down old St. George’s in Beekman Street, a venerable landmark.”

Scope and Content Note:

For records on St. George’s 1752-1811 parish registers, see Congregational Office—Official Acts. Chapel information can also be found in Vestry Minutes and Papers, Vestry Committee Minutes and Papers, and Rector’s papers. The archives has registers (1860-1867) and financial records (1861-1872) from the congregation of The Free Church of St. George’s Chapel and registers (1831-1860) of the Church of the Holy Evangelist.

 

St. John’s Chapel

1883-1912, 2 files

Historical Note:

St. John’s Chapel anchored the original Hudson Square, an early nineteenth century residential development just south of Canal Street in the Church Farm. The chapel was located on Varick Street facing St. John’s Park, a private area reserved for local residents. By the mid-1800’s, the neighborhood had begun to shift from well-to-do residential to commerce and manufacturing. As wealthy residents migrated further uptown, many of their homes were carved up into tenement housing for immigrants. In 1867, Trinity sold St. John’s Park to the Hudson River Railroad Co. for use as a railway terminal.

With its congregation moving northward and many of the neighborhood’s new residents immigrant Catholics, Eastern European Orthodox , Jewish or Muslim, the St. John’s congregation diminished throughout the late 19th century. The Rector Morgan Dix moved his rectory from St. John’s further uptown to Trinity Chapel on W. 25th St. The old rectory was turned into Trinity Hospital in 1872.

Trinity’s takeover of St. Luke’s in the West Village in 1892 further contributed to a movement to close St. John’s and merge its congregation with that of St. Luke’s. Action was finally taken after Dix’s death in 1908 when the new rector, the Rev. William Manning, moved to close the chapel at the end of the year. The announcement of the closing attracted much negative press, with Trinity facing opposition from the remaining St. John’s congregation as well as from preservationists who wished to save the historic chapel building. A committee representing the St. John’s congregation filed for an injunction before the State Supreme Court in an effort to prevent the closing. Judgment was made in favor of Trinity in the spring of 1909 and the Rev. Manning closed the chapel, merging the congregation with St. Luke’s Chapel. The building was demolished in 1918 by the city in order to widen Varick Street.

St. John’s Burying Ground was bounded by Leroy, Clarkson, Hudson, and Carmine (now part of Seventh Ave.) Streets in Greenwich Village. It was taken over by the city in 1896 for a public park, now called James J. Walker Park.

Scope and Content Note:

For records on St. John’s building, see also Finance—Property Management; for parish registers, see Congregational Office—Official Acts. Chapel information can also be found in Vestry Minutes and Papers, Vestry Committee Minutes and Papers, and Rector’s papers.

The archives holds two files on hymns and articles.

 

St. Luke’s Chapel

1946-1972, 1 box, .5 linear feet

Historical Note:

St. Luke-in-the-Field’s began in 1820 as an autonomous parish in the West Greenwich Village neighborhood. Trinity donated lots from the Church Farm to the new church. Clement Clarke Moore, author of ‘The Night Before Christmas,’ was a founding warden. Following a fire in 1886, the church’s congregation moved uptown to a new site in Harlem. In 1892, Trinity bought the land and buildings, restored the church, and brought St. Luke’s into the parish as a mission chapel.

After St. John’s Chapel closed in 1909, its congregation was merged with St. Luke’s. The Rev. Edward H. Schlueter was Vicar of the chapel from 1909 to 1945. Under his leadership, St. Luke’s was very active, with a number of societies, classes, and recreational pursuits. The chapel opened St. Luke’s School in 1945. St. Luke’s was made independent in 1976.

Scope and Content Note:

For records on St. Luke’s building, see also Finance—Property Management; for parish registers, see Congregational Office—Official Acts. Chapel information can also be found in Vestry Minutes and Papers, Vestry Committee Minutes and Papers, and Rector’s papers.

Files include directories that list names and address of parishioners and students. Also included are guides, services, and a donated chasuble. There are enrollment lists dating from 1945 to 1964 for St. Luke’s School.

 

Trinity Chapel

1855-1930, 2 boxes, 1 linear foot

Historical Note:

As Trinity’s congregation continued to migrate northward in Manhattan, the parish opened Trinity Chapel at 25 W. 25th Street, serving the once residential neighborhood around Madison Square. By the late 19th century, the area had changed from residential to retail, replete with theaters, hotels, boarding houses, and restaurants. The chapel faced a decline in communicants as parishioners migrated to the Upper East Side and areas beyond Manhattan.

In 1913 and 1914, discussions about moving Trinity Chapel’s congregation farther uptown and selling the chapel amounted to nothing. The parish still harbored hopes that the neighborhood would revive as a residential one, even while facing the reality that a number of churches in the area were competing for a dwindling number of Episcopalians. The chapel experienced a brief revival under the leadership of the Rev. J. Wilson Sutton, who was appointed vicar in 1917. However, the parish’s financial difficulties in the late 1930s forced it to again consider dissolving Trinity Chapel. The chapel closed in 1941 and the building was purchased by the Serbian Orthodox community, becoming the Cathedral of St. Sava.

A short-lived day school for girls at Trinity Chapel was discontinued in 1862, when a new school building was erected. The Trinity Chapel School became a day school for boys, growing from grammar and primary to high school during its history.

Scope and Content Note:

For records on Trinity Chapel’s building, see also Finance—Property Management; for parish registers, see Congregational Office—Official Acts. Chapel information can also be found in Vestry Minutes and Papers, Vestry Committee Minutes and Papers, and Rector’s papers.

Trinity Chapel records include printed items regarding the chapel’s consecration, leaflets, and a dedication plaque from the chapel’s library. The majority of records for Trinity Chapel are for the chapel’s school.

Anniversaries/Awards/Events

1895-1994, 7 boxes, 3.5 linear feet

Scope and Content Note:

The bulk of this material is the files of the Rev. Charles W. Newman, who joined Trinity as a priest in 1946, primarily to serve as Secretary of the Parish Anniversary Celebrations for the parish’s 250th anniversary in 1947. He was later Vicar of St. Paul’s Chapel from 1947 to 1949. (See Clergy series for Newman’s vicar files). There are also files, in the case of Trinity Church, on the 225th Anniversary, the Bicentennial, the Centennial of the Consecration of John Henry Hobart, and various other special events of the 20th century. St. Paul’s Chapel is represented by files on its 200th Anniversary. Material includes event planning, programs, photographs, and publications.

Service Material

1846-1984, 14 boxes, 7 linear feet plus oversize

Scope and Content Note:

This series contains items produced for worship services at Trinity Church and the chapels. The bulk of the material is orders of service. Also included are promotional items for Trinity events and programs that were handed out at services, as well as newsletters for parishioners.

 


Sermons

1728-1999, 5 boxes, 2.5 linear feet plus tapes and pamphlet boxes

Scope and Content Notes:

The sermons in this series are handwritten, on audio, or on video formats. Included here are sermons of the Reverends Beach, Hobart, Auchmuty, and Provoost. See also the Rectors Office series for other rectors’ sermons.

Official Acts

1716-1972, 14 boxes, 7 linear feet plus oversize

Historical Note:

Protestant Episcopal Church General Convention canons require that parishes keep records of baptisms, confirmations, communicants, marriages, and burials, and these records “shall be preserved by the Vestry or Board of Trustees as a part of the records of the congregation.” Trinity Parish records also include some transfers and members received.

Scope and Content Notes:

Material includes official bound registers, as well as slips filled out by clergy following services. Records are for Trinity Church and St. Paul’s Chapel as well as chapels when they were part of Trinity Parish.

Parish Ministry Programs

Trinity Church Association (TCA)

1883-1973, 12 boxes, 6 linear feet

Historical Note:

The Trinity Church Association was formed in 1879 to provide financial and administrative support to the charitable work performed by Trinity Church in downtown Manhattan. The association was incorporated in 1887 to, according to the charter, “establish, support, maintain or assist” a Mission House, an industrial or trade training school, a dispensary and a sea-side home as well as “lectures, instruction and entertainment for the poor and other religious, benevolent and charitable works and to elicit the active interest and co-operation of Christian laymen therein.” By 1973, it was decided that the parish could assume the responsibilities of the Association. In 1974, when the TCA was formally dissolved, it was supporting St. Margaret’s House Convent at 2 Oliver Street, Trinity Mountain Camp for Girls, as well as other charitable work. 

 

Treasurer

1882-1948, 2 boxes, 1 linear foot

Historical Note:

George M. Coit, vestryman from 1885 to 1903, was a member and Treasurer of the TCA at its conception.

Scope and Content Note:

Coit’s and successive Treasurers' files contain charters, deeds to TCA properties, reports, financial records, and minutes. See also Comptroller for financial files on the TCA. 

 

Secretary

1887-1974, 9 boxes, 4.5 linear feet

Historical Note:

Howard Praker was secretary to the Clerk of the Vestry since 1953 and Secretary to the TCA since 1954. Mr. Praker served until his death in 1971. Helen Rose Cline, parish recorder since 1957, was elected secretary in the annual meeting of April 5, 1972 after the death of Howard Praker. Ms. Cline saw the Association through its dissolution.

Scope and Content Note:

The secretary’s files contain charters, bylaws, handbooks, minutes, members’ lists, correspondence, financial files, gift files and dissolution files. 

 

Vice President

1914-1973, 2 boxes, 1 linear foot

Historical Note:

Warren H. Turner was the Deputy for Parish Administration (CFO) for Trinity Church from 1971 to 1974. He was elected Vice-President of the TCA on April 5, 1972 and oversaw the dissolution.

Scope and Content Note:

The vice president’s files contain incorporation papers, bylaws, membership files, financial files, and files on the St. Luke’s Hospital Fund, the Downtown Relief Bureau and the Trinity Church Dispensary. 

 

Trinity Church Association (TCA) Missions

1889-1975, 3 boxes, 1.5 linear feet

Scope and Content Note:

The records of the various mission activities supported by the Trinity Church Association include letters, clippings, annual reports, minutes, financial records, photos and film. 

 

St. Mary's Guild

1891, 1 file

Historical Note:

St. Mary’s was a guild for older girls.

Scope and Content Note:

The files contain rules, the constitution, and bylaws 

 

St. Monica’s Guild

1910-1976, 1.5 boxes, .75 linear feet

Historical Note:

A guild for women

Scope and Content Note:

The files contain minutes, membership information, treasurer’s files, correspondence, and Diamond Jubilee files.

 

St. John the Evangelist Guild

1889-1890, 1 file

Historical Note:

A guild for boys from 13 to 16 years that encourages them in the fulfillment of their religious duties.

Scope and Content Note:

The file is a membership dues book.

 

St. Stephen's Guild

1929-1975, 1 box, .5 linear feet

Historical Note:

A guild for young men of 16 and over.

Scope and Content Note:

The files contain minutes, correspondence, activity programs and photographs. Photograph scrapbooks were donated by Martin Rizek. See also The Financial District’s lost Neighborhood, 1900-1970 by Barbara and Martin Rizek and Joanne Medvecky (Portsmouth, NH: Arcadia Publishing, 2004)

 

St. Margaret’s House

1958-1974, 2 files

Historical Note:

St. Margaret’s House was the residence for the sisters of St. Margaret beginning September 1956 after the Trinity Mission House at 211 Fulton Street was closed. The 2 Oliver Street address was convenient to their mission work at the two lower east side chapels on Henry Street.

Scope and Content Note:

The archives holds the Services Record for St. Margaret’s House. 

 

Trinity Seaside Home

1893-1958, 3 boxes, 1.5 linear feet

Historical Note:

Trinity Seaside was a summer home for children at Great River near Islip, Long Island

Scope and Content Note:

The archives holds annual reports, minutes, slides, film and services records.

 

Trinity Mountain Camp for Girls

1961-1974, 2 files

Historical Note:

The mountain camp was a summer camp for girls in Sharon Connecticut that replaced the Trinity Seaside Home. The camp was opened in 1961.

Scope and Content Note:

The archives holds film and a services record.

 

Trinity Hospital

1897-1906, 1 file

Historical Note:

The Hospital began in 1874 as Trinity Infirmary housed in the former rectory at 50 Varick Street. In 1885, its name was changed to Trinity Hospital. It was under the care of the Sisters of St. Mary until 1901. The hospital was closed in 1908 when the building became too old and cumbersome to maintain.

Scope and Content Note:

The archives holds the case register. See also Hospital Committee minutes and Parish Yearbooks.

 

Missionary Society

1908-1944, 1 box, .5 linear feet

Historical Note:

The Missionary Society met weekly to do good works, visit the sick, and promote a good Christian life.

Scope and Content Note:

The Archives holds the minutes and Treasurer’s reports.

 

Here ends missionary programs managed and funded by the Trinity Church Association. *

 

Sunday School

1821-1822, 2 files

Historical Note:

The first formal Sunday School of the parish was instituted at St. John’s Chapel in 1817. It was immediately popular and spread throughout the parish.

Scope and Content Note:

The archives holds attendance records for 1821 and 1822.

 

Altar Guild

1898-1969, 2 boxes, 1 linear foot

Historical Note:

The Altar Guild tends the vestments, decorations of the altar and the flowers for the Church.

Scope and Content Note:

The records contain Minutes, Treasurer reports, account books, and letters

 

The Women’s Auxiliary

1902-1980, 4 boxes, 2 linear feet

Historical Note:

The Trinity Church branch of the Women’s Auxiliary was organized by Trinity Church Rector Dr. Morgan Dix on March 18 1902 to provide support for the Board of Missions.

Scope and Content Note:

The records include minutes and financial accounts. An evening branch of the Women’s Auxiliary was founded in 1953.

 

Men’s Committee

1914-1918, 2 files

Historical Note:

The Men’s Committee was formed in 1914 as an organization of laymen who could be of service to the Church.

Scope and Content Note:

The records are mainly documentation of the social survey of Lower Manhattan done to provide the committee with information on the social needs of the neighborhood.

 

Trinity Parish Group of Youth Consultation Service

1938-1957, 1 file

Historical Note:

The service later became the Trinity Church Group of the Mission of Help. This was a society that held benefits to provide assistance to troubled youth.

Scope and Content Note:

The archives holds minutes and accounts.

 

Noon at Trinity/Summer Festival

1968-1974, 3 files

Historical Note:

Noon at Trinity was, according to its brochure, a ministry to the Wall Street area in which the clergy offered services, dialog, special events and fellowship over sandwiches and coffee. In the summer of 1969 it expanded to present an arts program outdoors to reach out to the Wall Street Community and to encourage participation.

Scope and Content Note:

The files contain minutes, brochures and flyers.

 

Summer Youth Workshop

1972-1973, 2 files

Historical Note:

This program brought children of downtown employees to work with the summer festival and be introduced to downtown businesses.

Scope and Content Note:

The archives holds statement of goals and sermons.

 

Special Ministry in the Courts, John M. Corn

1969-1975, 30 boxes, 15 linear feet

Historical Note:

This ministry began as a program to work with young people who had come under the jurisdiction of the courts and developed into a ministry of prison reform, immigration, and counseling. It was terminated in 1975 due to budget cutbacks.

Scope and Content Note:

The Rev. Corn’s files are arranged by categories: Administrative, Aid to Offenders, Associations, Clients, Correspondence, Financial, General, Legal, Legal Advisory, Organization, and Programs. The files contain memos, letters, manuals, invoices, flyers and publications.

 

Weekday Ministries Program

1968-1973, 1 box, .5 linear feet

Historical Note:

The Reverend John W. Moody was director of the Weekday Ministries from 1968 to 1973. He employed the arts to attract downtown workers to the message of Trinity Church. Fr. Moody left Trinity in 1973 to help launch the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, a group whose inception had been partly inspired by Fr. Moody’s work at Trinity.

Scope and Content Note:

The files contain minutes, programs, reports, correspondence, schedules, clippings and publications..

 

Olive Chilton

1964-1976, 1 box, .5 linear feet

Historical Note:

Ms. Chilton was the Assistant for Christian Education.

Scope and Content Note:

Ms. Chilton's files contain booklets, reports, flyers, photographs, workshops, film and tape on Community Studies in Lower Manhattan, the Trinity Summer Festival and the Summer Youth Program.

 

Deputy for Parochial Ministries

Lloyd S. Casson 

1972-1976, 4 boxes or 2 linear feet

Historical and Scope and Content Note: 

The position of Deputy for Special Ministries was created in 1972 during the re-organization known as One Peppercorne. In 1973, the title was changed from Special Ministries to Parochial Ministries. The duties were to oversee the budget and development of the several parish programs, including the work of the Chapels. Fr. Casson’s files reflect program activity and include the separation of the chapels from Trinity Church.

 

Chapel Ministries

St. Paul's Chapel

1876-1971, 1.5 boxes, .75 linear feet

Scope and Content Note:

A file labeled “Organizations” has material on various activities held at St. Paul’s including the Glee Club and the Men’s Club. There also are minutes, treasurer’s reports, letters, and/or photographs for the Altar Guild (1940-1946), the Women’s Auxiliary Branch (1933-1944), the Luncheon Club (1921-1925), the Midday Club (1925-1927), St. Teckla’s Guild (1954, 1968), and the Filipino Congregation (1971).

 

St. Chrysostom's

1910-1924, 1 file

Scope and Content Note:

The file contains accounts, minutes and clippings on the St. Agnes Guild.

 

St. Christopher’s/St. Augustine’s Chapel

1942, 1954-1959, 3 files

Scope and Content Note:

The files contain the training program for the Lower East Side Mission Leadership.

 

Gifts

1696-1972, 2 boxes plus oversize

Scope and Content Note:

This series includes a variety of artifacts that have been donated to Trinity. Items include documents, clothing, portraits, souvenirs, prints and photographs, correspondence, small pieces of furniture, and scrapbooks.