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From the Archives

In honor of the Academy Awards, set to air this Sunday evening, February 26, here is a brief look at some of the actors that inhabit Trinity’s burial grounds:

In Trinity’s uptown cemetery, rests one of stage and screen’s most beloved actors, Jerry Orbach (1935-2004). Perhaps best known for his role on Law and Order and its various spin-offs, Orbach also appeared in the original

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Every February we celebrate Black History Month, or National African American History Month. It serves as an annual celebration of achievements by black Americans and as a time to recognize the central role of African Americans in United States history. One key figure, though lesser known, in U. S. history is Peter Williams Jr.—New York

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The theme for Trinity Institute’s 20th National Conference in 1989 was “Spirituality and Justice: A Seamless Garment.” This made choosing that year’s keynote speaker, the Rev. Desmond Tutu, a seamless decision.

Up to that point in time, Trinity parish and Desmond Tutu had been active in joint efforts to better a grim situation in South Africa and in Bishop Tutu’s

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For many years, Christmas was celebrated at the Trinity Mission House with parties and festivities for various parish guilds. The Mission House Record, a publication of the parish, tells the stories of these parties. Here's one such event:

On the Friday after Christmas in 1913, Mother Goose and her children paid a visit to the

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In 1972, Trinity Church acquired some videotaping equipment with a goal to begin experimenting with video communication within Trinity Parish, and to the general public, through cable.  What began with the airing of Sunday services in 1974, grew over the years into an original content producing, Emmy award-winning, TV and video production department – once known as Trinity TV. Today, church Services – along with original content, concerts, and more – are still produced by Trinity’s Media

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Originally opened in 1881 by the Trinity Church Association in order to “further the education of young men and women who had left school too soon,” (Dix VI, 409) the night school was so successful that it was taken over by the Vestry in 1882. The school was prosperous and successful through the end of the 19th century, teaching both men and women English, math,

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On the December 1, St. Paul’s Chapel will host the second historical pop-up exhibit. Between 11am and 1pm, visitors can learn about the Montgomery Monument, which is located on the chapel porch. It is the first national monument in the United States.  

Learn more about the recently restored monument in the video below. 

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November 25 this year falls the day after Thanksgiving and is likely to be publicized primarily as “Black Friday,” purportedly the biggest shopping day of the year. Almost forgotten these days is a celebration that would have been a major holiday in New York City during much of the late 18th and early 19th century—Evacuation Day.

The first Evacuation Day was

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November 11th commemorates the end of World War I and is a date on which we honor all U.S. veterans who have served and are serving in our country’s military. A walk through Trinity and St. Paul’s churchyards would remind you that many of our country’s earliest veterans are interred right in our parish’s lower Manhattan burial grounds.

Perhaps the largest monument in either churchyard is the Soldiers’ Monument which stands in the Northeast corner of Trinity churchyard and memorializes

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All Saints Day, when many churches celebrate the saints and remember those who have died, is an important day on the Church calendar. But for the Parish of Trinity Church, All Saints Day is also a day to remember and celebrate one of the parish’s longest tenured rectors, Rev. Morgan Dix, who was born on All Saints Day, November 1, 1827.

The Rev. Morgan Dix served as rector of Trinity Church from 1862 to 1906. He served the church, and the lower Manhattan community, at a time when the

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