Updates

From the Archives

On October 21st, Trinity’s Archives will celebrate New York Archives Week (as well as the impending 250th anniversary of St. Paul’s Chapel) with a small pop-up exhibit and tours of St. Paul’s Chapel. For information, see the Archives Week event listing here.

Archives Week, sponsored by the Archivists Round Table of Metropolitan New York, Inc., is meant to bring

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Trinity’s prolific noonday concert series is set to return for another season of providing music by supremely talented musicians to downtown’s lunchtime crowd. While noontime organ concerts began in the mid-1920s under organist Channing Lefebvre, it was a later organist and Trinity Music Director, Larry King, who officially started the noonday concerts in which

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September 22 is American Business Women’s day, which marks the day, in 1949, on which the American Business Women’s Association (ABWA) was founded. The ABWA’s work focuses on bringing businesswomen together and to provide them with additional opportunities to grow personally and professionally. These sentiments were shared by one of St. Paul’s earliest ministries geared towards working women, The St. Paul’s Chapel Business Women’s Lunch Club.

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Long before school shopping revolved around tablets and backpacks (and more likely involved book straps and slide rules), St. Paul’s Chapel displayed long and enduring commitment to the education of the citizens of New York by hosting a number of schools and education ministries under its auspices. Now that September has arrived and school is back in session, here’s a look back at some of St. Paul’s Chapel’s more notable endeavors in education.

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On Monday, September 3, the United States will celebrate Labor Day, an opportunity to honor the contributions of the American worker to the nation’s success. It’s a good day to consider a question we hear a lot at Trinity: Who built the church? 

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In August 1756, the cornerstone was laid for King’s College, now known as Columbia University. The new school was built on land granted by Trinity in 1754, but Trinity’s relationship to the school started much earlier than that. In 1703, when a college affiliated with the crown was just a fledgling idea in the Royal Governor’s head, Trinity’s vestry preemptively resolved to give land:

It was unanimously agreed That the Rector & Church Wardens should wait upon my Lord Cornbury

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Today, Trinity Church Wall Street serves its congregation both in-person and online with daily webcasts of services. Those webcasts can be traced back to Trinity’s pioneering involvement in another broadcast medium: radio.

The first radio stations in the nation began to appear in 1920, and in November of 1922 New York’s brand-new WEAF station asked Trinity if they could broadcast their services. Trinity declined. Just a month later, however, Trinity’s vestry appeared to have a change

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August is recognized as National Inventor’s Month—a time to honor our nation’s great thinkers, creators, and inventors. One such inventor is Robert Fulton, interred in Trinity Churchyard. Though he is best known for his steamboat, Fulton was an accomplished inventor and engineer, creating the first practical submarine, some of the first naval torpedoes, and the first steam-powered war ship. The Clermont, Fulton’s steamship, traveled between New York and Albany and was the first successful

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The Parish of Trinity Church, founded in 1697, is quite old—but did you know that Trinity’s north churchyard is even older? Used as a public burial ground dating back to the Dutch period, the north churchyard was probably being used as early as the 1660s. Read more

For much of Parish’s history, Trinity has provided food to the hungry, the underprivileged, and the downtown community as a whole and as a way of nourishing those in need bringing people together.

While Trinity’s feeding ministries date back to the Parish’s earliest days

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