Updates

From the Archives

There are many tales and legends that surround the infamous Captain William Kidd. A fascinating and, perhaps, misunderstood character of history, Kidd is often associated with sea piracy and allegedly burying treasure in the Caribbean in the later parts of the 17th century. But Captain Kidd is also sometimes associated with Trinity Church, and for good reason. After all, it was this week, 320 years ago, when Kidd agreed to lend Trinity a hand with the construction of the first Trinity Church

Read more

On July 9, 1976, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II visited Trinity Church as part of her trip to the United States for the nation’s Bicentennial of American Independence celebration. The Queen, however, was not simply visiting Trinity to take in its architecture or to wander through its churchyard, as many visitors do today. Rather, Queen Elizabeth II was at Trinity that day to symbolically collect 279 years of back rent in the form of 279 pepper corns (yes, like those used in a pepper grinder

Read more

On July 4, we celebrate Independence Day—a national holiday which commemorates the work of our country’s founding fathers and the adopting of the Declaration of Independence (the signing of that document occurred two days earlier on July 2, 1776).

When we use the term “founding father,” what do we mean? For some, it is a general term referring to those prominent politicians, soldiers, and citizens who helped in the fight for American Independence. Others use it more narrowly,

Read more

West Cornwall Episcopal Center was dedicated June 19th, 1954. Though this marked the beginning of the space as a conference center, it had a storied life before this day as the location of Trinity’s summer camp. In honor of the upcoming Trinity Camper Reunion Retreat, we’re going to look at summer camps throughout Trinity’s history.

Summer is a time to slow down, enjoy the sun, and

Read more
Trinity Church first opened its doors for services in March of 1698 but it wasn’t until 1703 that its Vestry formed a committee to consider acquiring an organ. Thirty six years later, in 1739, John Clemm (Johann Klemm) of Philadelphia made a proposal to build an organ for the Church which was accepted. The entirety of the Vestry meeting of June 1st, 1739, was about the organ: 
 
Mr. John Clemm of Philadelphia Organ maker laid before the Vestry a Scheam for making
Read more

On this day, in 1851, it was resolved by the Vestry of Trinity Parish that a gift towards the endowment and support of the Missionary Bishoprick at Cape Palmas be made – marking Trinity’s first grant work in Africa.

Trinity’s gift to the Missionary Bishoprick at Cape Palmas in Africa, which was established under the authority of the General Convention of the Episcopal Church in the United States of America, was in the form of an annual salary

Read more

Each year, the Episcopal Liturgical Calendar marks the publishing of the first Book of Common Prayer, printed in 1549, on a weekday following the day of Pentecost. This year, we take a look at the publishing of that first Book of Common Prayer, as well as several historical Books of Common Prayer from Trinity’s Archives.

The Act of Uniformity was passed by the House of Lords on January 15th, 1549, and with it the Latin mass was abolished in

Read more

The foundation stone of St. Paul's Chapel was laid on May 14, 1764 on what was then called "The Broadway." The first services were held over two years later, on October 30, 1766. This fall, St. Paul's Chapel will celebrate its 250th anniversary. 

St. Paul's Chapel was created as the second "chapel of ease" by Trinity Parish. The city’s population had grown, and additional Anglican churches were needed. Also, Trinity Church was in a busy area of town, while St. Paul’s was in a quieter

Read more

On May 5, 1748, Trinity resolved to erect a structure for the Charity School, present-day Trinity School. The school, founded in 1709, had previously held classes in Trinity’s steeple.Read more

On April 23, 1702, Queen Anne ascended to the throne, vacated by the death of her brother-in-law and cousin, William III. Upon her ascension, Trinity’s vestry wrote to her to congratulate her. In the letter, dated December 15 1702, Trinity also congratulates the Queen on her choice of Royal Governor for New York, Edward Hyde, Viscount Cornbury. The previous Governor, the Earl of Bellomont, had brought the church “into great danger of being disunited.” Cornbury, however, had already “given

Read more

Pages