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Voices from the Trinity community

November 11th commemorates the end of World War I and is a date on which we honor all U.S. veterans who have served and are serving in our country’s military. A walk through Trinity and St. Paul’s churchyards would remind you that many of our country’s earliest veterans are interred right in our parish’s lower Manhattan burial grounds.

Perhaps the largest monument in either churchyard is the Soldiers’ Monument which stands in the Northeast corner of Trinity churchyard and memorializes

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In August 1756, the cornerstone was laid for King’s College, now known as Columbia University. The new school was built on land granted by Trinity in 1754, but Trinity’s relationship to the school started much earlier than that. In 1703, when a college affiliated with the crown was just a fledgling idea in the Royal Governor’s head, Trinity’s vestry preemptively resolved to give land:

It was unanimously agreed That the Rector & Church Wardens should wait upon my Lord Cornbury

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August is recognized as National Inventor’s Month—a time to honor our nation’s great thinkers, creators, and inventors. One such inventor is Robert Fulton, interred in Trinity Churchyard. Though he is best known for his steamboat, Fulton was an accomplished inventor and engineer, creating the first practical submarine, some of the first naval torpedoes, and the first steam-powered war ship. The Clermont, Fulton’s steamship, traveled between New York and Albany and was the first successful

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It's Tony Awards weekend, honoring the best of Broadway. If we can believe the buzz, including the predictions of the "experts," it should also be a very big weekend for Hamilton, the musical that's redefining the term "hottest ticket in town."

The success of Hamilton has sparked renewed interest in Trinity Church Wall Street’s role

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On this day, in 1851, it was resolved by the Vestry of Trinity Parish that a gift towards the endowment and support of the Missionary Bishoprick at Cape Palmas be made – marking Trinity’s first grant work in Africa.

Trinity’s gift to the Missionary Bishoprick at Cape Palmas in Africa, which was established under the authority of the General Convention of the Episcopal Church in the United States of America, was in the form of an annual salary

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The foundation stone of St. Paul's Chapel was laid on May 14, 1764 on what was then called "The Broadway." The first services were held over two years later, on October 30, 1766. This fall, St. Paul's Chapel will celebrate its 250th anniversary. 

St. Paul's Chapel was created as the second "chapel of ease" by Trinity Parish. The city’s population had grown, and additional Anglican churches were needed. Also, Trinity Church was in a busy area of town, while St. Paul’s was in a quieter

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On April 23, 1702, Queen Anne ascended to the throne, vacated by the death of her brother-in-law and cousin, William III. Upon her ascension, Trinity’s vestry wrote to her to congratulate her. In the letter, dated December 15 1702, Trinity also congratulates the Queen on her choice of Royal Governor for New York, Edward Hyde, Viscount Cornbury. The previous Governor, the Earl of Bellomont, had brought the church “into great danger of being disunited.” Cornbury, however, had already “given

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On April 6, 1917, the United States formally entered World War I.  

For nearly three years, America had remained neutral in the

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          Palm Sunday procession at St. Augustine’s Chapel in 1960

In this exhibit, as we trace Holy Week and Easter through Trinity’s history, we see the evolving nature of service bulletins and the emergence of printing. Once an expensive art form limited to the domain

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A depiction of the original Trinity Church building

On March 13th, 1698, the first service was held in the original Trinity Church building. Construction wasn't completely finished, but the building committee minutes instruct that the church is to "be cleared and put in the best posture they can

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